DYNA6.1 FAQs

 

Question:   We have multiple machines on a single raft/mat/piled raft and may be all of them working and/or some idle. I would like to know whether DYNA6.1 can analyse these scenario by switching on/off machines. Although you mentioned that your program can support single and multiple machines, does this mean that the program can analyse multiple machines working at the same time. If yes, what is the maximum number of machines it can model.

Answer:   Yes, it can handle any number of machines on the same foundation, including the case of some being idle. Simply, the load from an operating machine represents its contribution to the response. If the machine is idle, motor/compressor combinations. Also, it can model a rectangular hole in the footing.


Question:   Does DYNA6.1 do lateral dynamic load too, or only vertical load.

Answer:   DYNA6.1 does vertical, lateral, rocking and torsional loads.


Question:   Can you please provide me with some description of its capabilities and foundation types it can handle.

Answer:   The DYNA6.1 program returns the response of rigid foundations to all types of dynamic loads. The rotation of centrifugal or reciprocating machines, shock-producing machines, earthquakes, traffic and other sources of dynamic forces can produce these loads. The foundation can be supporting a single or multiple machines. The response to harmonic loading for a flexible, rectangular mat on elastic half-space or on a group of piles can also be calculated. The stiffness and damping constants of the foundation (needed for the analysis) are evaluated within the program for surface foundations, embedded foundations and piles, pile interaction in a group and other features. For rigid footings, all six degrees of freedom are considered as coupled machines. Although you mentioned that your program can support single and multiple machines, does this mean that the program can analyse multiple machines working at the same time. If yes, what is the maximum number of machines it can model.

The foundation stiffness and damping constants (matrices) are also returned for possible use in soil-structure interaction analysis. These constants are available for rigid footings, flexible mats (caps) on piles, or piles without any connecting cap, and also for flexible mats on elastic half-space.


Question:   We have an ongoing machine foundation project which I hope your program DYNA6.1 can be utilised for. We need to analysis multiple vibrating machines placed on a single raft.

Answer:   The DYNA6.1 program returns the response of rigid foundations to all types of dynamic loads. The rotation of centrifugal or reciprocating machines, shock-producing machines, earthquakes, traffic and other sources of dynamic forces can produce these loads. The foundation can be supporting a single or multiple machines. The response to harmonic loading for a flexible, rectangular mat on elastic half-space or on a group of piles can also be calculated. The stiffness and damping constants of the foundation (needed for the analysis) are evaluated within the program for surface foundations, embedded foundations and piles, pile interaction in a group and other features. For rigid footings, all six degrees of freedom are considered as coupled.


Question:   Our firm has a project that requires soil-structure interaction analysis for shallow foundation on pile. Would DYNA6.1 be the right program for us.


Answer:   Yes, you are correct, DYNA6.1 is the right software for the job you describe. It can calculate the frequency dependant stiffness and damping constants of both shallow and pile foundations to different types of dynamic loads.


Question:   Can it handle large pile groups? (300-400).

Answer:   Yes.


Question:  Can it make coupled analysis (meaning can it take the effect of change in pore pressures during analysis) and include the effect of liquefaction?

Answer:   No it does not. The effect of increased pore water pressures can be accounted for approximately by adjusting the shear modulus of the soil to reflect the corresponding degradation. It can model effect of liquefaction by reducing shear wave velocity of liquefied layer to expected level. It can model effect of liquefaction by reducing shear wave velocity of liquefied layer to expected level.


Question:  What is the theoretical background?

Answer:   Based on Novak’s plane strain theory for single piles, and interaction factors effects considering Kaynia and Kausle (1982) and El Naggar and Novak (1995) for considering the stiffness and damping of the pile group.




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Updated June 24, 2013 by cquintus
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